Tagged: Kris Ruby


NY Social Media Marketing Expert Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group on The Ingraham Angle

NY Social Media Marketing Agency Owner Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group was recently on The Ingraham Angle on Fox News discussing the intersection of big tech/ government, as well as censorship of certain conservative news channels on Google, and the potential impact this could have.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nL6cn7-ykEk&feature=youtu.be

 

 

 


NY Social Media Expert Kris Ruby on Fox & Friends First

NYC Social Media Marketing Expert Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group was recently on Fox & Friends First. Apple was recently urged to do more to combat iPhone addiction among kids. Is it really Apple’s responsibility to parent children? Click the link below to watch the full segment.

https://youtu.be/jEfiOvfQQUs



Ruby Media Group Featured in 914 INC Magazine

Westchester NY Social Media Marketing Agency Ruby Media Group was recently featured in 914 INC. Magazine’s “Social Media Playbook” feature article. Click here to read the full article!

 

Why you should never post the same content on every social media platform

I cringe when I hear small business owners talking automating their social media channels so that one post goes out to all of their networks at once. Don’t do this! This feels like spam to your audience. Cross-posting the same piece of content adds very little value to your followers and network.

It is important to respect the platform “atmosphere” of how people share content and the experience they are looking to get on each social media channel.

Something that would be perfectly acceptable to post within the Snapchat ecosystem may feel entirely offensive and amateur to someone’s professional network on LinkedIn.

How to create content for each social media platform

Your friends, followers, and social media audience is looking for different interactions depending on which social media channel you are on. For example, someone on Snapchat is looking for quick, engaging videos most likely with geotags and face filters, whereas someone on Facebook would be more likely to “like” a family photo.

What should you do instead of cross-posting?

  1. Edit the copy or creative to match the platform.
  2. Post the content on social media platforms where it will resonate with that audience.

How to repurpose social media content on different platforms

Here is how I repurposed the article I wrote titled 13 legal mistakes your business is making on social media.

Same piece of content, yet entirely different post strategy on each platform.

Facebook. Shared the article link along with a paragraph of descriptor text on why this matters and why people need to read it. This yielded high engagement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twitter. Wrote entirely new copy to promote the article from a different angle- why it is incumbent upon PR Firm agency owners to understand the legal side of social media.  Included relevant hashtags in the legal industry to get on the radar of more attorneys.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Instagram. I wanted to post this as a stand-alone post, but knew it wouldn’t have yielded high engagement.  Instead, I posted a screenshot of the original Observer article on mobile and uploaded it to RMG’s live Instagram Story and wrote on it “new blog” with an upward arrow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snapchat. Chose not to share the article at all because it would have looked spammy.

LinkedIn. Shared the article link with paragraph of descriptor text- also yielded high engagement.

Again, notice how it is the same piece of content, yet the article copy and creative is entirely different with each post depending on the platform?

Social Media Strategy Posting Tips

As a small business owner, you need to plan out not only the creative, but your distribution plan around the creative as well.

So for example, at the beginning of every week, we have content lined up for clients, but we will then create a specific posting plan for each individual piece of content on how we will promote it on each social media channel.

Sometimes, our NY Social Media Agency will create a piece of content that is great for Instagram, but won’t work for a client’s Facebook page.

Other times, we will update a client’s Instagram 1x per week, whereas we update their Facebook 3x per week because the content will resonate with their target audience in that digital channel.

Social Media Marketing for Business Tips:

It is critical to review the analytics in any social media campaign.

Identify:

  • Where your target audience is
  • What social media platforms your target audience uses
  • Execute a social media strategy
  • Analyze the results

What content is best on Facebook?

  • Educational content
  • Photos
  • Articles with descriptive text
  • Tagging others to amplify reach

What content is best on Snapchat?

  • Filtered posts
  • Location tags
  • Light and breezy content

What content is best on Instagram?

  • Instagram Stories
  • Aesthetically pleasing feed posts
  • Bulleted copy

What content is best on LinkedIn?

  • Long-form published articles
  • Lengthy posts
  • Videos

Social Media Key Takeaway for Small Business Owners:

Stop posting the same content on every social media channel!


Personal Branding Tips in Commercial Real Estate- How to Build a Brand that will get you noticed

 

NY Social Media Marketing Agency Founder Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group was recently featured in the October print edition of Real Estate Forum/ Globe St. In the feature article on personal branding for commercial real estate executives, Ruby shared expert insights the state of personal branding for commercial real estate executives. You can read the full interview here. If you are unable to open the link, here are some personal branding tips for commercial real estate executives. The article can be found in the 2017 Real Estate Forum Magazine October issue titled “ABC’s of Commercial Real Estate: Building Your Brand”

What is personal branding?

Personal Branding is a way of differentiating your value proposition from other competitors in the market. Ideally, your personal brand would stand out from others in the commercial real estate industry and separate you by what makes you most unique. For example, in commercial real estate, are you branded as a keynote speaker? As a leader in the regional real estate market? As an early adopter of social media in real estate? As the Snapchat leader for real estate executives? Or, is your brand defined by the continued content you byline in Forbes as well as trade publications? All of these attributes can factor into a strong personal brand.

How long does it take a commercial real estate executive to build a personal brand?

Building a personal brand of a commercial real estate executive does not come out of thin air. Fundamentally, the personal brand needs to be grounded in hard facts. You can’t just declare yourself an expert or real estate guru without having the success and properties to back it up.  The first thing a journalist will ask for is to see your deal sheets and property fact sheets. If you are going to tout yourself as an expert and try to get coverage, you need to have all of these materials ready before you embark on your personal branding mission.  You also need to make sure you have crafted your personal branding “story”— the entrepreneurial angle or human interest angle that differentiates you from every other real estate executive. Be sure to include a Q & A section as well. These materials are critical if you want to pitch outlets that could help support the development of your personal brand strategy. Do not even think about approaching a media outlet without having this ready to go. Real estate is also fiercely competitive. If you want to develop a personal brand in commercial real estate, you will need to state your opinion on what other developers are doing or building so it is clear where you stand. Neutrality and soft opinions don’t really hold up that well in this vertical. If you want to be branded, you can’t be afraid to speak. This definitely separates those who are trying to build brands from the ones who actually have.

Why is personal branding so important for commercial real estate executives? 

Personal branding is critical for commercial real estate executives because it is essentially one of the only ways to separate yourself from the oversaturated market today. It used to be enough to invest in a good website and traditional sales tactics. Today, that is the very minimum that is required. Personal branding can include everything from influencer marketing, SEO, content marketing, traditional PR and more! People want to work with someone who has a strong personal brand that they have already encountered online before ever picking up the phone. They want to be consumed by several touch points of the brand or ‘person’ before speaking to them.

What are the challenges of personal branding for commercial real estate executives? 

The biggest challenge of personal branding is defining a brand that is authentic to you as a business leader. Just because you see a real estate executive on television or doing frequent Facebook Lives with thousands of viewers doesn’t mean that is the most effective way to build your personal brand. You need to do what feels most comfortable to you instead of pushing too hard to fit in with what everyone else is doing.  Another challenge of personal branding is setting your frequency limits for communication. If you want to be frequently communicating 24/7, you may need to have a team in place to help on the execution side of this including editorial, web, branding and SEO in addition to production.

What are some effective personal branding techniques and strategies for commercial real estate executives? 

The most effective personal branding technique for commercial real estate executives would be crafting bylined content in national media outlets to attract a following. Commercial real estate execs could consider writing about market trends, industry insights or roundups from conferences. Another effective branding technique for commercial real estate execs is to incorporate in traditional Public Relations. A commercial real estate could discuss market trends on a national news show such as MSNBC or Bloomberg. They may also discuss a hot item in the news and their unique angle on it. Effective personal branding would be leveraging the segment through social media marketing including Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIN to promote the appearance. Another key component of a personal branding campaign for commercial real estate executives is publishing frequent content on LinkedIN pulse. The branding game for commercial real estate is long lead— it takes a while to develop the personal brand you desire but once you have it things will start snowballing from there, especially with media opportunities. If you are looking to develop a personal brand or get some of your properties in the news, you may also want to start following the commercial real estate writers on Twitter and liking or favoriting their tweets to get on their radar before you ever reach out to them.  From my experience, it can take a commercial real estate executive several years before they start to see the traction they are looking for in regards to their personal branding campaign. However, it is worth it when things finally to start to pick up. It is important to note that a truly authentic personal brand is not built overnight.

Still unsure of how to develop a personal brand on social media? Click here for 10 ways 10 leverage social media in commercial real estate. 


10 Ways You’re Sabotaging Your Chance Of Media Coverage

PR pitching mistakes

How to Get Media Coverage For Your Business

Securing press coverage for your business is a continual process.  Pitching the media can take months before a journalist is interested in picking up your story.

DIY public relations guides teach business owners how to get their pitch picked up.

But that is only half of the equation!

Business owners are often caught off guard when the media replies to a pitch they sent out and is finally interested in writing about them.

If you don’t have the proper assets to give to the media when they are ready to interview you, you may be sabotaging your golden opportunity for earned media coverage.

In this article, you will learn:

  • How to prepare for media interviews
  • How to pitch the media & press
  • 10 pitching mistakes to avoid

10 PR & Media Pitching Mistakes 

As a seasoned Public Relations specialist for over a decade, I have seen Executives sabotage themselves when they try to pitch the media. They routinely make the same mistakes which hurt their media relations efforts and can kill a story. But luckily for you, you can learn from their mistakes and from my industry knowledge to get more traction for your PR campaign.

Avoid these PR mistakes!

1. Not having high-resolution photos: It perplexes me how many entrepreneurs pitch the media and do not have a simple high-resolution photo or headshot. This is an absolute must if you are pitching a personal branding angle to a journalist or if you are trying to secure a column in a trade publication as a contributor. If you don’t have a high-res photo, you can delay the entire process. You also need to have branded lifestyle photography for feature articles or human interest stories. If you are pitching an entrepreneurial angle, an editor will want to see you in action, meeting with clients or doing what you say you do best. Newsrooms are severely understaffed, so don’t expect a reporter to send a photographer to your office for a photo shoot.

2. Wearing clothing that clashes on camera:  If a producer wants to book you for a national television segment, they will want you in the studio within a few hours. Finding television friendly attire that looks good on camera can be time-consuming. Start looking for outfits well before you are ever booked for a TV segment. For men, this can be as simple as a nice suit. For women, bright-colored dresses with short sleeves or three-quarter sleeves work well. To avoid any on-camera surprises, make sure you have tried on the dress sitting down to see how long it will appear on screen.

3. Using an outdated executive bio: Do you have a recently updated executive bio that can accompany all of your outbound pitches to the media? If not, start working on this now. You should have a few different variations of your bio: one for trade publications, one for consumer pitching and a different version for bylines.

4. Missing contact information:  This sounds simple, yet so many people skip this obvious step. They pitch the media and do not include an email address or a cell phone number to reach them on their website. Journalists don’t want to spend time submitting lengthy contact forms to reach you. Make your contact information visible in the footer of your site to increase your chances of visibility. If you are going to provide a phone number, make sure it is a direct line, and not a spammy 1-800 number.

5. Missing media collateral:  If you are pitching a human interest story to the media, journalists will want to see some basic information. This makes their lives significantly easier so they can review these pertinent details working on the story. It may also spark new story angles they may not have thought of.  Include FAQs about the “why” of your business. Try to answer all of the questions you think they may have so they can pull in relevant details from the Q&A or fact sheet. Always send this in Microsoft Word and avoid sending a PDF.

6. Including photos without image names:  Journalists work on several different stories at a time and speak with different sources. If a journalist requests photos, make sure each photo has a file name instead of the regular “DSC2019.” Naming the image file will also give you an added SEO boost if they decide to run the images with the story. Think about the search terms you want to rank for when considering what to name each file.

7. Not having additional sources on file: If you are a doctor who is pitching a broadcast segment about a new health epidemic, make sure you have other sources lined up to support the claim. You sitting alone in a dark room discussing the story is not a complete segment. The media may want to speak with someone who was impacted by the epidemic, a professor on the epidemic and also have you provide your medical expertise on the story. They are also going to want b-roll footage as part of the package. Make sure you have all of this lined up before you pitch the media.

8. Using expired Dropbox links:  Set up a Dropbox account before pitching the media. There is nothing more frustrating to a journalist than emailing a source numerous times and waiting to get the story assets they need, especially because of something like an expired Dropbox link.

9. Missing major newsworthy talking points:  If you are pitching yourself as an expert, you must be frequently consuming the news. A journalist doesn’t want to hear that you have never heard of the story they are working on that is trending in your industry. If they call you for a quote about a story and you have no idea what they are talking about, they will seriously question your credibility. I set up Google alerts for my industry so that I am always well-versed to comment on breaking news.

10. Lacking knowledge of what the media likes:  If you want to be quoted in the media as a subject matter expert and thought-leader, educate yourself on what journalists are looking for in expert sources. You can search on Twitter under the #PRFail hashtag to see what journalists hate. If a journalist asks your opinion, they aren’t looking for a one-line response. If you give them a one-liner, they are less likely to quote you. It is better to give more substantial content to a journalist that they can pull quotes from then to give less.

Not following these public relations tips could reduce the likelihood of being included in a story.

How do I get the media’s attention?

Start by following this list!

Media Pitching 101 Checklist:

  • High-resolution headshots
  • Lifestyle Photos (horizontal)
  • TV-ready attire at the office (in case the media calls!)
  • Updated executive bio
  • Contact information is easily accessible
  • Updated media collateral
  • FAQ document in Word
  • All photos are properly named
  • Additional sources are ready to comment
  • Dropbox links are active (not expired!)
  • Google Alerts set up for your industry

How do you approach a journalist?

Give journalists what they want, how they want it, when they want it and in the preferred format they want it in.

How to get major media coverage for your business 

Sick of sabotaging your chances at media coverage through failed DIY PR attempts that lead nowhere? Contact us today to start increasing exposure and visibility for your business.

Media Interview Preparation Resources

Media Interview Checklist

Media Training Guide

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kris Ruby has over 12 years of experience pitching the media. As a seasoned public relations specialist, Kris Ruby has secured thousands of media impressions and press placements for clients in national publications. Ruby Media Group is an award-winning NY Public Relations Firm and NYC Social Media Marketing Agency.  The New York PR Firm specializes in healthcare marketing, healthcare PR and medical practice marketing.  Ruby Media Group helps companies increase their exposure through leveraging social media and digital PR. RMG conducts a thorough deep dive into an organizations brand identity, and then creates a digital footprint and comprehensive strategy to execute against. Specialties include content creation, strategic planning, social media management, and digital public relations. RMG helps clients shine in the digital space by extracting their strengths, developing story ideas, and crafting compelling news angles to ensure journalists go to their clients first as story sources and thought leaders. Ruby Media Group creates strategic, creative, measurable targeted campaigns to achieve your organizations strategic business growth objectives.


Top NY PR Firm CEO Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group in Huffington Post

NY PR Firm Owner Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group was recently featured in The Huffington Post describing her top entrepreneurial tips and journey over the past ten years in business. To read the full interview, click here 

Publicity Strategist Kris Ruby

“PR agencies that only offer traditional public relations will soon become obsolete. You need to diversify your offering to remain competitive.” -Kris Ruby/ Ruby Media Group

I had the pleasure to interview Kris Ruby, CEO of Ruby Media Group, a Leading New York Public Relations Firm and NYC Social Media Marketing Agency. Ruby is a sought after social media marketing strategist and PR consultant with 10+ years building successful brands. The New York PR Firm handles PR and social media for some of the top doctors in the tristate area. In addition to running a thriving social media & PR firm, Kris Ruby is also a trusted media source and frequent on-air commentator on social media marketing on the nation’s top TV shows.

Yitzi: Thank you so much for your time, Kris. I know that you are a very busy person. Can you share your “backstory” with us?

I went to Boston University’s College of Communication and majored in Public Relations. By the time I graduated, I had 13 internships in all different facets of the communications industry. I was also fortunate to have one of these internships lined up for full time work upon graduation. Within a few weeks, I realized I would never be able to work for anyone else and launched my own company, Ruby Media Group. Ten years later, I never looked back.

I will never understand corporate America or what it is like to have a steady paycheck, company covered health insurance or any of the perks of having the stability of a “regular” job. However, I know I would suffocate and not be able to do my best work if I ever worked full-time in an organization. I love the freedom and flexibility to create that comes with being an entrepreneur.

I don’t believe being an entrepreneur is a choice. It is fundamentally who you are, and ingrained in your personality. The concept of entrepreneurship is trendy right now, but it is not something to take lightly. It comes with massive responsibility and a lot of uncertainty. It can also come at the expense of other aspects of your life like a social life or a long-term relationship. For many people, the idea of constantly being in survival mode is extremely off putting. For me, I thrive in it and can’t imagine any other way.

Yitzi: How did you get involved in the PR industry?

I launched Ruby Media Group in Westchester County, NY as a social media marketing agency. When I started the agency several years ago, social media was still new and most business owners needed assistance with how to leverage it to build their business. One of my social media clients, a retail store in Rye, NY, asked me to do PR for the launch of their new store. So, I basically had to teach myself PR and do it by trial and error. Other than what I knew from PR textbooks at BU and my previous internship experience, the responsibility was on me to learn the tricks of the trade.

Anyway, the store launch was a huge success, and we ended up receiving recognition and awards for the work my agency did. Word of mouth started to spread that we could offer public relations, and gradually our business shifted to incorporate a heavy amount of “social PR” in addition to regular social media marketing. Today, I think businesses really need a nice mixture of both PR and Social Media in order to have maximum reach in digital platforms.

Yitzi: What do you wish someone told you when you started in the Public Relations industry?

I wish someone told me how important “soft skills” are in addition to having premium knowledge in your field. A breakdown in communications can lead to a “break up” in the agency client relationship. This was very difficult for me to learn because I always thought that knowledge was enough, and that soft skills were more critical in larger corporate environments. I tend to operate at 150 miles per hour and expect everyone around me to be at the same pace. I have had to learn the hard way to slow down (a bit!) and that people have other things going on in their life besides their PR campaigns. Today, I believe management skills are critical for everyone to learn, whether you are a solopreneur or the owner of a Fortune 500 company.

A mistake I made and that many entrepreneurs make is that they don’t invest in these skills and instead opt to invest in things more critical like new technology to service clients. You can have the best technology in the world, but if there are breakdowns in communication, you will have no one to use the technology on.

Frequent turnover is not profitable, and neither is the cost of acquiring and training new talent. Effectively learning how to communicate is an essential skill for any PR agency owner or entrepreneur.

Yitzi: What are you most proud of?

I am most proud of the fact that I have done all of this on my own. I did not have outside investors and started my company with less than $500 in my bank account when I graduated college. I appreciate and recognize the hustle in others who have done the same. I am also proud of the fact that I have built a successful New York PR firm without going the traditional agency route. I believe that if I can do it anyone can do it who wants it badly enough. However, this does mean doing it all on your own, constantly learning new skills and troubleshooting problems.

I am also fortunate to have a great mentor who is a 30 year veteran of the PR industry, Greg Books. He has taught me so much about running a profitable agency, and how to have better client relationships. I am forever indebted to him for the client service skills he has tried to teach me (although sometimes I’m not a star student!).

Yitzi: Do you think the PR profession has changed over the past 30 years? How?

Absolutely! I believe that PR agencies that only offer traditional public relations will soon become obsolete. Securing press coverage through earned media is only one part of a comprehensive public relations campaign. I also believe that securing press coverage isn’t necessarily what a client needs all the time.

The best agencies are able to adapt to the business challenges a client has and offer them solutions around their pain points. Some months, that may mean content marketing, other months it may mean a heavy focus on digital marketing. The one thing that is consistent is that only offering traditional PR will not satisfy a client for an extended period of time. The age-old question of ROI and “So what?” will soon come up, no matter how many national press placements you secure. That is why you need to diversify your offering to stay competitive.

For example, we offer clients a combination of content marketing, social media and digital PR. I also think the rise in new media platforms that connect journalists in real-time to potential sources has changed the PR landscape. The method of offering journalists what they need in real time vs. pitching them on items they may or may not be working on is an infinitely more effective approach. We believe in “social PR” and optimized content that leads to conversions. I also refer to this as reactive PR vs. proactive PR.

Yitzi: What drives you as an agency owner?

Seeing clients get media coverage! Or seeing a client’s new article perform very well and get hundreds of likes and impressions! For me, there is no greater feeling than that. For example, a plastic surgeon may look at a before and after of a patient and say, “Wow, look at the amazing work!” For me, the equivalent of that is going on Google News, Googling my clients, and seeing a solid page of national media outlets coming up for their name. Another example would be doing a before and after makeover of their Instagram grid to see the difference in branding.

We have a strong focus in public relations for doctors, medical practices and physicians, so this would be the best analogy. I particularly like helping doctors receive recognition for the work they do in helping patients. The other fun part of all of this is that I get to learn medical information while promoting doctors to national media. I am naturally interested in medicine and healthcare, so I am very fortunate that I have the opportunity to work with (and promote) the brightest minds in medicine. It also helps me become a walking encyclopedia of random medical facts, which my family always finds amusing yet helpful at times!

Yitzi:  Based on your personal experience, what advice would you give to young people considering a career in PR?

PR is not glamorous. It is not what you thought it was growing up watching “Sex and the City.” The majority of time, I am behind my computer answering numerous emails and responding to reporter requests. Also, you have to be really comfortable with rejection. If you want to work in an industry where everyone likes you or thinks you’re great, this is the wrong industry. You have to have really thick skin. I would also urge a young person interested in a career in public relations to start branding themselves. Also, take advantage of internship opportunities to figure out what type of PR you like best. For example, fashion PR may be a better fit for someone who loves events and networking, whereas medical PR may be more ideal for someone who prefers being behind a computer and researching medical facts.

Yitzi: You are known as one of the leading social media experts and have been on national television over 90 times. What advice can you give others who want to do the same?

Start local. When I started out, I lived in Westchester, NY and Greenwich, CT before ever doing a national TV appearance. For 5 years, I woke up at 3 am and traveled an hour to WTNH in CT to do local TV segments. You need to build a base of television experience before approaching the larger networks. Also, if you want to be on TV, you should be publishing frequently and promoting your content on Twitter. That is how I got discovered and booked for my first TV appearance by a Producer who read my JDate article on why social media changed the dating landscape.

I would also urge people to consider what it is they want to get out of being on TV. When people ask me how to get booked on TV, I always ask why they want to be on Tv in the first place. Usually, the response is flimsy, so I urge them to consider what their long-term PR goals are and how this fits in with it. I love being an on-air commentator and discussing the latest breaking news and how social media fits into it. However, I also have to balance this with being a publicist who is behind the scenes.

Yitzi: Which skills do you think are most important to becoming a successful PR professional?

Perseverance and determination. My motto is, “Turn every no into a yes.”

Yitzi:  You are in a position of influence. How have you used your position and skill to bring goodness to the world?

I try to give back by teaching public relations students at universities through Facebook Live. I find this very rewarding and love offering career advice to aspiring publicists. I would love to get more involved with mentoring aspiring publicists- perhaps I will create a program around this.

Yitzi:  Do you believe location matters when starting a social media agency or PR agency?

No, absolutely not. Since launching Ruby Media Group, I have operated my business out of Westchester, NY, Greenwich, CT and even Wall Street. The most important thing is a wifi connection and communication with the media and clients. I am  confident I could be successful running the company from Kentucky just as much as Wall Street.

Hone your craft and focus on results. Results infinitely trump location. I wish more people knew this before packing up and thinking they need to be in NYC to make it in this industry. It is a myth!

Yitzi: Thank you so much Kris! It has been a pleasure to learn about your entrepreneurial journey in the PR world!