Tagged: Kris Ruby


Kris Ruby in NY Post Discussing Instagram Meme Purge

NYC Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby, President of Ruby Media Group, was recently quoted in a NY Post article on the Instagram meme purge. Click here to read the full article “Instagram’s purge of accounts cost this teen $4,000 per month.”

Instagram Meme Purge

During the recent meme purge, many any of the Instagram meme accounts were suspended without warning. This move left many Instagrammers wondering what policy they violated. Users had no idea why they were suspended. Why does this matter? For two reasons:

1) Vague content policies leave users wondering where they went wrong and what TOS they violated.

2) It is becoming increasingly challenging for content creators to build a business where their sole revenue comes in from third-party social media platforms.

The recent Instagram meme purge is a great example of why. You are essentially dependent on a third-party platform to host all of your business content. If that third-party decides to remove you from the platform (for whatever reason they deem fit) your business is essentially demolished overnight and you lose that income stream.

Social media platforms are rented virtual property. You must diversify your assets – just as you would in real estate. The same applies for social media.

Do not put all of your social media marketing eggs in one basket. You can not trust that these platforms have your best interest in mind.

Focus on creating owned media and always back up your content.

This article originally appeared in MarketWatch.

 

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NYC Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby on Fox News Discussing New Inclusive Language Guide

Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group was recently on Fox News “Fox & Friends” Discussing Colorado State University’s new all inclusive language guide. To watch the full segment, click here. 

 

Should Marketers Adopt Gender-Neutral pronouns?

The Rise of Gender-Neutral Marketing Pronouns 

As marketers and copywriters, we take for granted using basic pronouns.

Of all of the copy changes we make on any given social media post, blog or ad, pronouns are typically not the first thing we think of.

All of that will soon change.

Think about every famous ad that includes pronouns that are now considered offensive. Take Maybelline for example. “Maybe she’s born with it. Maybe it’s Maybelline.”

In today’s political climate where PC language reigns supreme for brands, this ad would be considered offensive.

How would you rewrite that ad in a way that is no longer offensive?

And if you do rewrite it, does it still carry the same appeal?

The war on language will be the biggest thing to disrupt marketing.

The pronouns we take for granted will soon become obsolete in a world that is banning words and rewriting the language.

What do you think, marketers? Is this something you have been thinking proactively about with new ad copy?

Is this a good thing or a bad thing for marketing?

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NY Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby Discusses FaceApp Privacy Concerns

Ruby Media Group CEO Kris Ruby was recently on i24News discussing the privacy concerns surrounding FaceApp. Click here to watch the full segment. Should you be concerned about FaceApp? Will your data be compromised?

If you are so worried about the Russians access to your data, why are you not worried about access to your data that big tech companies hold here in the US? The hypocrisy in all of this is the real issue.

Everyone is so focused on this “FaceApp” they forget that the big tech companies here have massive access to your data.. and who really knows what they do with it.. Kris Ruby’s take on FaceApp below and why this is only the tip of the iceberg in the larger privacy debate with big tech.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sucyDt5Zkm0
FaceApp Privacy Concerns

 

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NY Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby on Fox News Discussing Nike Kaepernick Controversy

NYC Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group was on Fox News discussing the latest Nike controversy with Colin Kaepernick and the Betsy Ross Flag. Click here to watch the full segment.

Nike Should Brands Get Political

 

Should brands get political? 

The Arizona Governor pulled Nike Tax break incentives after Colin Kaepernick blocked the release of the new Nike betsy Ross-themed 4th of July sneakers.

The Governor was willing to sacrifice economic activity for his state to not allow a company that he perceived to be Anti-American.

Nike crossed such an extreme line with the decision to pull the Betsy Ross themed Fourth of July sneakers that the Governor was willing to lose their business and not do the deal.

Political correctness can only go so far before it has the opposite effect.

If you start losing tax breaks because of PR/ Marketing stunts, there is now a direct cost.

How many states will follow suit in terms of the precedent this sets and do the same to other brands who want to insert themselves into politics?

Yes, there is a direct cost of being too political as a brand.

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Branding Expert Kris Ruby on Fox News Discussing Nike Betsy Ross Flag Controversy

NY Branding Expert Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group was recently on Fox Business discussing the Nike Betsy Ross Flag Controversy. Click here to watch the full segment.

Nike Betsy Ross Branding

 

In a hyper-politicized environment, should brands take a stance? 

How is it that these sneakers could have gotten shipped to retailers without anyone internally from Nikes marketing and communication team seeing an issue with this?

If using this flag was as insensitive as Colin Kaepernick states that it is, what does it say about Nike’s C Level leadership team (and CMO!) that not a single person there noticed anything wrong with it?

Is Nike’s branding team that out of touch with their audience?

Did Nike fail to do any market research?

Did Nike’s marketing or internal com team raise any red flags?

Or are they solely relying on an outside brand ambassador to run marketing for a global brand.

Why Nike’s Marketing Strategy is not brilliant

Brands take calculated risks when it comes to politics.

Yet, in a hyper-political world, brands such as Nike seem to be doing the opposite, even if it means potentially offending half of your potential consumer base.

Nike has chosen to align with identity-driven causes that are controversial.

While this is in unity with what their target audience is looking for, what about other possible growth sectors?

Nike is legally responsible to shareholders to make profitable decisions.

So where does taking a stance on cause-marketing come into play, and what if these decisions hurt profits?

Should Nike put culture politics above market wisdom of a billion dollar corporation?

What brands can learn from Nike 

If you want to align your brand with America’s Culture War and political correctness, expect backlash on social media (and beyond!).

Understand that Political Correctness can cost your corporation.

Short-term profitability or spikes in the market do not necessarily show long-term damage from brand equity or how the brand is perceived. A great example of this is when the Arizona Governor nixed tax incentives for Nike as a result of this recent marketing stunt for political correctness.

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NY Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby Discusses New Wearable Tech Device

NY Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group was recently on Fox News “Cavuto” discussing a new wearable tech device that allows you to assign remote shocking privileges to your loved ones. Would you try it? Click here to watch the full segment.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3R69gNxGAK8
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