Tagged: Kris Ruby

Political Advertising On Social Media

Paid Facebook ads have always been a critical tool for political campaign managers to target prospective voters.  However, Elizabeth Warren recently dared Facebook with an intentionally false ad. In a recent Fox News segment, Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group discussed anti-conservative bias in big tech. Click here to watch the full segment.

 

Should Google, Facebook or Twitter control and moderate political speech?

If you turn on cable news today, you will see a slew of lower thirds such as “the dangers of political ads on the web.”

But just how dangerous are these political ads on social media?

Yes, political ads spread misinformation. How is this any different from the political ads that run on television that also spread misinformation?

Why are we asking for a new set of rules for digital advertising that we have not demanded from traditional advertising?

SOCIAL MEDIA POLITICAL AD POLICY

Political advertising in the digital age.

Online social media platforms are now facing growing pressure to stop running political ads that show false or misleading claims ahead of the 2020 U.S. presidential election. Politicians, pundits, digital advertisers, marketers, and the general public have debated whether there should be stricter regulations around political advertising on social media.

Politicians run political ads on social media in a variety of rich media forms including:

  • Retargeted videos
  • Sponsored Snapchat geo-filters to targeted locations
  • Boosted and sponsored posts

HISTORY OF POLITICAL ADVERTISING

Digital advertising on social media is a critical tool for candidates to find donors and sway voters. 2020 presidential candidates have reportedly spent almost $100 million to date on digital advertising on social media platforms. Trump reportedly spent the largest amount of money on digital advertising among 2020 presidential candidates.

Is it really big-techs role to limit and control how campaigns can reach voters?

Online advertising is much more precise in comparison to broadcast television ads in terms of the ability to reach the end user. This is the magic of digital advertising vs. traditional marketing.

Why should we kill that just because politicians want to take a stance?

Critics claim that on TV, political ads are highly regulated. However, they still contain falsehoods despite the regulation.

Why should political ads on social media be treated differently than political ads on television? Why the double standard?

“In the United States, the Communications Act prevents broadcast stations from rejecting or censoring ads from candidates for federal office once they have accepted advertising for that political race, although this does not apply to cable networks like CNN, or to social media sites, where leading presidential candidates are spending millions to target voters in the run-up to the November 2020 election.”

Broadcasters must adhere to the Federal Communications Act, which states they have no power of censorship over the material broadcast.

Lies have always been a key feature of political campaigns since the dawn of time. So, why this rush to control digital advertising on social media sites?

FACT: Digital advertising works \better than traditional forms of media when you are looking to target a specific group of people. Politicians are afraid of the power of micro-targeting. They don’t want to be blamed if someone wins that was not considered the popular choice, which is why there is an outcry from congress as to why this targeting should be hindered for political candidates.

SOCIAL MEDIA: NEW RULES FOR POLITICAL ADS

Digital ads on social media platforms are not subject to the same disclosure regulations that apply to traditional television and political ads on radio and other traditional media vehicles. However, people are putting pressure on social media platforms to ban political ads.

Political Ad Policies

So, how are tech companies handling misleading claims in political ads?

Here is a rundown of the current social media policies of big-tech giants.

FACEBOOK POLITICAL AD POLICY

Politicians are exempt from third-party fact checking, meaning politicians are allowed to run ads with false claims. Elizabeth Warren criticized this policy and said it could cause a spread of misinformation. She ran a false ad on Facebook to highlight this issue, which I recently discussed in the above segment on Fox News. Zuckerberg has repeatedly said it is not his role to censor political speech. However, Facebook does fact check content from political groups.

Facebook now requires mandatory disclosures so people know who is running political ad campaigns. Facebook recently tightened rules for US political advertisers ahead of the 2020 election.  Political advertisers are required to display a confirmed organization label to show government issued credentials. Any advertiser running political ads are also required to post their contact information.

Facebook requires political advertisers in the U.S. to:

  • Submit a U.S. mailing address and identity document
  • Supply a phone number, business email and web site
  • Submit a federal election commission ID number, tax registered ID number or government website domain.

Facebook Political Ad Policy

GOOGLE POLITICAL AD POLICY

Google will limit audience targeting for election ads to age, gender and location at a postal code level. Political advertisers can no longer target ads using data such as public voter records and general political affiliations such as right-leaning, left-leaning or independent.  Google is also restricting an advertisers ability to micro target political ads on Search and YouTube.  Google is also getting rid of the customer match feature, which enables campaigns to match profiles with voter data.

Will Facebook follow suit by getting rid of custom audiences? I don’t think so, considering this is part of the powerful engine that drives ad revenue for the platform. They have too much to lose by doing that.

Google Political Ad Policy

TWITTER POLITICAL AD POLICY

Twitter recently banned all political ads that include content that references a political candidate, party, election or legislation. The company also said it will not allow ads that advocate for a specific outcome on political or social causes.

Twitter is considered the smallest player within the political online advertising space. Political ads do not make up a substantial portion of Twitter’s revenue, therefore this move is less of a risk for Twitter than it is for Facebook or Google.

Twitter Political Ad Policy

The pros and cons of restricting political ads on social media

PROS

  • Proponents of limiting campaign microtargeting believe it could curtail election interference and misinformation.

CONS

  • Could hurt less well-known candidates
  • Could suppress voter turnout
  • Control all digital political speech.

As big tech companies overhaul their politician ad polices in favoring of limiting politicians’ ability to target voters through microtargeting, this will potentially hurt the smaller campaigns who rely on microtargeting to reach new audiences. It could essentially wipe out any of the small plyers from even having a chance to compete. It is actually going to rig the system in favor of only those with large pockets.

Not every campaign can afford television ads. Many can only afford digital ads with smaller budgets. If we kill off that option, we are killing off the ability for new players to enter into a free-market political race.

Will government regulation affect growth? 

Limiting how narrowly politicians can target voters and the types of ads politicians can run on social media platforms is not the real issue.  The question of government regulation looms over the digital advertising ecosystem. The biggest threat to Facebook and Google will be who wins the next political election. Believe it or not, the greatest thread to digital ad growth is politics. Google controls 90 percent of the market and has no real competition.  None of these digital ad platforms are growing as quickly as they used to. The only way they will grow is to buy smaller faster growing social media networks (like Tik Tok). The prospect of regulation may introduce a real hurdle for ad growth. If these tech companies are broken up in an antitrust probe, this would be a disaster for profitability.

POLITICAL ADS ON SOCIAL MEDIA: KRIS RUBY’S FINAL THOUGHTS

Microtargeting enables politicians to reach specific groups of individuals through digital advertising. It has come under fire by critics because it enables politicians to target narrow groups of voters. Critics say this has to potential to “manipulate” the political debate and upcoming elections.

However, microtargeting on digital ad platforms is the key behind the rapid growth of digital advertising. This is, after all, why so many media buyers have shifted paid media spends to digital advertising in the first place.

If we limit the ability of the Internet to do what it is very best at, aren’t we censoring this powerful form of advertising?

We are telling people this form of advertising works so well that therefore we are going to limit your ability to use it. What kind of message is that to send to consumers?

Imagine saying, this car drives too well, so therefore, it’s unfair if it stays in the market. We are going to only give you the option to buy a slower car.

Why should one be penalized for the righteous advantage of knowing how to use digital advertising and deploy it to target voters? That is not manipulation, it is having a competitive advantage and skill set of how to deploy digital advertising across multiple channels.

If we start to censor one’s ability to use these marketing vehicles as they were intended to be used, we are going down a very slippery slope.

And, if microtargeting is so controversial, then why has it not been removed in every other area outside of political advertising? It enables anyone to target niche groups of people with tailored messages, not just politicians! It gives people the ability to narrowly reach their target audience and end user.

That is not manipulation; it is good marketing!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group is a frequent commentator on Fox News. She reports on Facebook, Google and Big-Tech Privacy Concerns.

 

 


Public Relations Podcast: Inbound PR Success

Inbound PR Kris Ruby podcast

 

Listen to the Inbound Success podcast interview I recorded to learn more about public relations and how you can leverage PR as part of your inbound marketing strategy.

“It’s so interesting to me that somebody from the PR world so intuitively gets what it means to do inbound marketing correctly.  There’s a lot of practical information here for any marketer who has ever considered using PR as part of their strategy.”-Kathleen Booth, Inbound Success Podcast Host

Inbound Success Podcast

“Ruby Media Group CEO Kristen Ruby breaks down the top myths surrounding PR and inbound marketing. In this podcast, Ruby gets into detail about who should consider using PR, when to use it, how much you should expect to pay, and what kinds of results you should expect when you hire a PR firm.”

In addition, we cover the difference between PR for brand building and PR for SEO, as well as the difference between reactive and proactive PR.

Listen to the full PR podcast episode here 

INBOUND PR PODCAST HIGHLIGHTS

Highlights from the Inbound Success Podcast Interview: 

  • A PR specialist is different than a media relations specialist.
  • PR can encompass anything in a communications and marketing plan, whereas media relations is specifically about interaction with the media.
  • PR is a great strategy for any business or healthcare practice that is looking to build a long-term, sustainable funnel of leads.  It is also great for building your personal brand.
  • One of the key benefits of PR is that it can contribute to building your domain authority, which is helpful for SEO.
  • In terms of setting expectations for a PR engagement, the results you can achieve are very dependent upon the news cycle and what journalists and reporters are interested in covering.
  • You should expect to commit to working with your PR firm at least one hour each day.
  • When it comes to inbound PR, it’s important to build up online authority so that the media sees you as a credible source. Building this authority starts with what you are doing offline. The key is to translate that offline authority into digital platforms.
  • For doctors looking to get started with healthcare PR, publish content that is aligned with your media coverage goals. This content can be published on your website, LinkedIn profile, etc.
  • The cost of PR can vary widely depending upon the scope of services, the type of media coverage that you’re looking for and the size of the NY public relations firm you want to work with.
  • If you want to be on national TV as part of your PR plan, it is worth investing in media training as part of your public relations campaign.  This will prepare you to be on camera and to learn how to field difficult questions from TV anchors, reporters and journalists.
  • There’s a difference between reactive and proactive PR. Kristen specializes in reactive PR, which entails responding to reporters’ requests for sources, as opposed to proactive PR, which she says is going out to the media and spamming them with unsolicited pitches.
PR quotes kris ruby PR podcast

Listen to the Inbound Success podcast to learn more about public relations and how you can leverage it as part of your inbound marketing strategy.

In an exclusive 45-minute PR podcast interview, you will learn the answers to your most pressing questions about PR and inbound marketing including:

  • What is inbound public relations?
  • The difference between PR and media relations
  • How we built a clients Domain Authority to 32 only using PR (and no paid advertising!)
  • Why media coverage success rates are significantly higher when you practice reactive PR
  • Why Twitter is critical for your public relations strategy
  • PR for brand building vs. PR for SEO
  • Why content marketing and Inbound marketing must work together for a successful Inbound PR strategy

PLUS 

  • What makes for a newsworthy story?

 

ABOUT THE PR PODCAST GUEST

Kris Ruby specializes in strategic Public Relations and Media Relations and has over 12 years of experience. To view a full list of Kris Ruby’s podcast appearances, click here. 

Podcast hosts: Do you have a podcast about PR? Are you looking for Public Relations Execs to share key insights? If you are interested in having Kris Ruby, CEO of Ruby Media Group, on your podcast to discuss all things PR, drop us a line.

P.S: We are passionate about educating people on how to leverage PR to increase exposure. If you have a B2B or Healthcare marketing podcast and you are looking for a guest to educate your listeners about public relations, I am happy to share PR tips with your audience.

Plus, we always promote PR podcast appearances on social media if the information is valuable for our audience and people can learn key takeaways from the interview.

For interview and media requests, contact us here.

inbound pr podcast kris ruby


Kris Ruby in NY Post Discussing Instagram Meme Purge

NYC Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby, President of Ruby Media Group, was recently quoted in a NY Post article on the Instagram meme purge. Click here to read the full article “Instagram’s purge of accounts cost this teen $4,000 per month.”

Instagram Meme Purge

During the recent meme purge, many any of the Instagram meme accounts were suspended without warning. This move left many Instagrammers wondering what policy they violated. Users had no idea why they were suspended. Why does this matter? For two reasons:

1) Vague content policies leave users wondering where they went wrong and what TOS they violated.

2) It is becoming increasingly challenging for content creators to build a business where their sole revenue comes in from third-party social media platforms.

The recent Instagram meme purge is a great example of why. You are essentially dependent on a third-party platform to host all of your business content. If that third-party decides to remove you from the platform (for whatever reason they deem fit) your business is essentially demolished overnight and you lose that income stream.

Social media platforms are rented virtual property. You must diversify your assets – just as you would in real estate. The same applies for social media.

Do not put all of your social media marketing eggs in one basket. You can not trust that these platforms have your best interest in mind.

Focus on creating owned media and always back up your content.

This article originally appeared in MarketWatch.

 


NYC Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby on Fox News Discussing New Inclusive Language Guide

Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group was recently on Fox News “Fox & Friends” Discussing Colorado State University’s new all inclusive language guide. To watch the full segment, click here. 

 

Should Marketers Adopt Gender-Neutral pronouns?

The Rise of Gender-Neutral Marketing Pronouns 

As marketers and copywriters, we take for granted using basic pronouns.

Of all of the copy changes we make on any given social media post, blog or ad, pronouns are typically not the first thing we think of.

All of that will soon change.

Think about every famous ad that includes pronouns that are now considered offensive. Take Maybelline for example. “Maybe she’s born with it. Maybe it’s Maybelline.”

In today’s political climate where PC language reigns supreme for brands, this ad would be considered offensive.

How would you rewrite that ad in a way that is no longer offensive?

And if you do rewrite it, does it still carry the same appeal?

The war on language will be the biggest thing to disrupt marketing.

The pronouns we take for granted will soon become obsolete in a world that is banning words and rewriting the language.

What do you think, marketers? Is this something you have been thinking proactively about with new ad copy?

Is this a good thing or a bad thing for marketing?


NY Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby Discusses FaceApp Privacy Concerns

Ruby Media Group CEO Kris Ruby was recently on i24News discussing the privacy concerns surrounding FaceApp. Click here to watch the full segment. Should you be concerned about FaceApp? Will your data be compromised?

If you are so worried about the Russians access to your data, why are you not worried about access to your data that big tech companies hold here in the US? The hypocrisy in all of this is the real issue.

Everyone is so focused on this “FaceApp” they forget that the big tech companies here have massive access to your data.. and who really knows what they do with it.. Kris Ruby’s take on FaceApp below and why this is only the tip of the iceberg in the larger privacy debate with big tech.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sucyDt5Zkm0
FaceApp Privacy Concerns

 


NY Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby on Fox News Discussing Nike Kaepernick Controversy

NYC Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group was on Fox News discussing the latest Nike controversy with Colin Kaepernick and the Betsy Ross Flag. Click here to watch the full segment.

Nike Should Brands Get Political

 

Should brands get political? 

The Arizona Governor pulled Nike Tax break incentives after Colin Kaepernick blocked the release of the new Nike betsy Ross-themed 4th of July sneakers.

The Governor was willing to sacrifice economic activity for his state to not allow a company that he perceived to be Anti-American.

Nike crossed such an extreme line with the decision to pull the Betsy Ross themed Fourth of July sneakers that the Governor was willing to lose their business and not do the deal.

Political correctness can only go so far before it has the opposite effect.

If you start losing tax breaks because of PR/ Marketing stunts, there is now a direct cost.

How many states will follow suit in terms of the precedent this sets and do the same to other brands who want to insert themselves into politics?

Yes, there is a direct cost of being too political as a brand.


Branding Expert Kris Ruby on Fox News Discussing Nike Betsy Ross Flag Controversy

NY Branding Expert Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group was recently on Fox Business discussing the Nike Betsy Ross Flag Controversy. Click here to watch the full segment.

Nike Betsy Ross Branding

 

In a hyper-politicized environment, should brands take a stance? 

How is it that these sneakers could have gotten shipped to retailers without anyone internally from Nikes marketing and communication team seeing an issue with this?

If using this flag was as insensitive as Colin Kaepernick states that it is, what does it say about Nike’s C Level leadership team (and CMO!) that not a single person there noticed anything wrong with it?

Is Nike’s branding team that out of touch with their audience?

Did Nike fail to do any market research?

Did Nike’s marketing or internal com team raise any red flags?

Or are they solely relying on an outside brand ambassador to run marketing for a global brand.

Why Nike’s Marketing Strategy is not brilliant

Brands take calculated risks when it comes to politics.

Yet, in a hyper-political world, brands such as Nike seem to be doing the opposite, even if it means potentially offending half of your potential consumer base.

Nike has chosen to align with identity-driven causes that are controversial.

While this is in unity with what their target audience is looking for, what about other possible growth sectors?

Nike is legally responsible to shareholders to make profitable decisions.

So where does taking a stance on cause-marketing come into play, and what if these decisions hurt profits?

Should Nike put culture politics above market wisdom of a billion dollar corporation?

What brands can learn from Nike 

If you want to align your brand with America’s Culture War and political correctness, expect backlash on social media (and beyond!).

Understand that Political Correctness can cost your corporation.

Short-term profitability or spikes in the market do not necessarily show long-term damage from brand equity or how the brand is perceived. A great example of this is when the Arizona Governor nixed tax incentives for Nike as a result of this recent marketing stunt for political correctness.


NY Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby Discusses New Wearable Tech Device

NY Social Media Strategist Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group was recently on Fox News “Cavuto” discussing a new wearable tech device that allows you to assign remote shocking privileges to your loved ones. Would you try it? Click here to watch the full segment.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3R69gNxGAK8