Tagged: Ruby Media Group

PR Don’ts: 11 Ways to Annoy a Journalist

These common faux pas will ensure that you’ll get cut from their story

Congratulations! A reporter wants to include you in a story. Whether it’s because your site is optimized or you’re highly visible on social media, a journalist has found you and is interested in writing about your business. However, a journalist finding you is just the starting point. Every word you say to a reporter from the second they reach out to you until the story goes live matters.

Here are the 10 most common ways to annoy a journalist and risk getting cut from a story.

  1. Speaking in industry jargon. There is a reason people hire publicists: They know how to speak journalists’ language. Publicists know what journalists are looking for, when they are looking for it, and how they want to consume it. If a reporter reaches out to you, do not start speaking in industry jargon. A reporter wants the simplest version that their readers will understand. They want you to break down your story in a way that makes sense to consumers—not to other people in your industry. They are coming to you because you’re an expert. Boil down your points so they are digestible to the masses.
  2. Answering 10 hours later. Reporters are working on deadlines. Typically, a reporter is working on several different stories at once, not just the one they emailed you about. The sources that get back to them the fastest are most likely to be included in their story. If you answer them 10 hours later, they might already be working on their next story. If you see an email with “Press Request” or “Jane Doe from X News,” be sure to prioritize it.
  3. Referring them to your publicist who doesn’t answer. If you hire a PR person to handle your media, make sure they are responsible. The worst mistake you can make as a business owner is referring a journalist to your press person, only to have them answer a week later. If you notice your PR person hasn’t answered a reporter within one to two hours, it’s time to find someone new. Your PR person should be optimizing your chances for press coverage, not diminishing them.
  4. Blowing their story on social media. If a reporter invites you in to film a segment, listen very carefully to what they ask you to do. If they say, “No photos or videos from this can be leaked on social media until after the story is published,” do not post anything. Recently, I filmed a behind the scenes segment for a story I was working on and the source leaked the entire story on Instagram Live. I will not include them in any further stories. If you’re that impatient for a story to go live that you have to leak it on social media, you don’t deserve to be in the story.
  5. Asking them to pay for things. If a journalist is interested in featuring your product in a story, it’s important to pay any associated costs that go along with this. If you don’t, you make it very difficult from them to try the product and ultimately feature you. If a journalist wants to feature your product, do not ask them to pay for the product, the shipping of your product, or your travel expenses to get it in their hands. If you are lucky enough to be considered, bite the bullet and pay the associated costs.
  6. Asking multiple times when the story is coming out. Once a story is filed, a journalist has to deal with several other departments. First, the story has to pass through their editors. Then, the story may have to go through the art department. When the story comes back to you, there may be new edits you want, which starts the whole process again. A journalist does not owe you an explanation of when their story is live. If you’re concerned, set up a Google alert for the journalist’s name and outlet so that you receive a notification when it comes out. Don’t annoy a journalist by asking when an article is coming out. Most of the time, they don’t know.
  7. Promoting a story without tagging the journalist on social media. Journalists are all competing to get eyeballs on their writing. If you’re lucky enough to be included in a story, journalists want to see that you’re promoting the link on your social media accounts. Don’t make a faux pax by promoting the link without including the journalists handle on Twitter or Instagram. Journalists pay attention to which sources are social media savvy. If you push their content, it doesn’t go unnoticed.
  8. Copping an attitude. If a journalist is including you, do not harass them. A journalist is featuring your product and helping you increase sales, so if you cop an attitude with them, why would they ever want to include you? A journalist is not concerned with how prominently your product is featured; they’re concerned with the facts of the story. The more you make it about you, the less credibility you have.
  9. Sending PDF’s. If a journalist asks for your press kit, do not send them a PDF. If a journalist has to copy and paste your PDF into word, many times the characters don’t show up or there is a break in the code. You want to make their life easier, not harder. Also, be sure to include product “blurbs” or descriptions in whatever press materials you give them. If you ever wonder why certain products have longer descriptions than others, this is why. If you don’t give a journalist source material to pull from, your paragraph will be shorter.
  10. Sending broken Dropbox links. If a journalist asks for your press kit and you send them a Dropbox link, do not deactivate the link after one day. Most of the time, the journalist may not open up the Dropbox link until the night before their deadline. If you deactivated the link, how are they supposed to pull your information for the story?
  11. Asking for changes after a story is published. Finally, if a journalist includes you in a story, do not badger them about making changes after the story goes live. If you want to ask them to change the spelling of your company name, that’s fine. But do not ask them to change what they have written about your company. Also, do not ask them to change website URL’s and descriptor text because your marketing manager said it would help you rank better on Google. This is a completely inappropriate ask. You have control over your assets on your site, not over another publication’s.

When you are communicating with journalists, remember to be appreciative. Journalists work hard to put together stories. Many of the journalists today are contributing writers for publications, in addition to having full-time jobs (such as myself). Journalists are very aware of the promotion you’re getting (for free) by being included in a story. Having a basic understanding of this dichotomy will take you far. If you are lucky enough to be included in a story, follow these tips and don’t blow it! If you make these mistakes, don’t be surprised if you “die on the chopping block floor” as the old saying goes.

Kris Ruby is the CEO of Ruby Media Group, a public relations and social media agency. Ruby is a frequent on air TV commentator and speaks on social media, tech trends and crisis communications. For more information, visit rubymediagroup.com or krisruby.com

 



RMG Featured on AOL Small Business – Twitter Freelancers

AOL Small Business: Twitter Freelancers: Can You Really Get Paid To Tweet?

Read the full article here

FacebookTwitter and LinkedIn have become cheap, effective ways to advertise and build personal connections with customers — and for many businesses, tweeting and blogging are no longer optional tools for generating buzz. As such, the rising importance of social networking as part of anymarketing plan has brought about a new demand for online-savvy freelancers who know how to effectively write and distribute business communiques at a rapid pace.

Because of its speed and simplicity, Twitter — the popular microblogging service started by Jack Dorsey, Evan Williams and Biz Stone in 2006 — has become a preferred option for many companies. While some hire social-media gurus in-house, others are enlisting the help of a growing corps of freelancers who have taken advantage of an emerging market for independent “tweeters” and have built lucrative businesses on the art of the 140 character burst.

Ruby notes that the market for freelance social media experts is so strong because Web 2.0’s cheap, highly personalized marketing techniques have made traditional marketing plans obsolete. “Social media has evolved into a cost-effective strategy in reaching out to targeted audiences and beyond. The key to social media is to identify your target audience beforehand and engage them in an industry-based dialogue.” Ruby’s goal is to work with companies to get audience attention through tweeting and other strategies and interact with their customers. She also provides advice for company leaders about how to rethink their marketing plans and embrace the power Twitter and other social networking sites have to build brands.

So what advice would Jaehnig and Ruby offer other prospective freelance tweeters and social media experts? Ruby feels ethics are critical to anyone who wants to ghostwrite for a company: “If a company hires me and does not provide me with an internal contact to tweet with and receive corporate information from on a daily basis, I will most likely turn down the business, as I don’t want to misrepresent the company,” she says. “But I realize that a consultant can only know so much about what is going on inside a company without being there on a daily basis. I think this is one of the biggest problems that will arise with companies outsourcing tweeting if they are not careful. There need to be strict guidelines in place for this, because we are essentially representing their brand online.”


Proud to Sponsor A Taste of NYC at 42 Restaurant in Westchester, NY- All Proceeds go to A Circle of Life Camp for Children with Diabetes

Taste of NYC

July 29, 2010 7pm
42, The Resturant
The Ritz Carlton, White Plains, NY

Featuring the favorite foods of NYC with a twist by Chef Anthony Goncalves

Please register online:

https://www.mycampregistration.com/Member/Default.aspx?CEID=MjYyNjRfNjMw-OaXG61F9jMU=

Please call 518-459-3622 with any questions.

About A Circle of Life

To provide the fundamental age-appropriate diabetes education, medical and psychological treatment, and social support essential for children and adolescents to properly manage their diabetes and cope with their disease.



RMG Reports: YJP Fashion Summit Tips from Top Fashion CEO’s

 

YJP Fashion Summit Tips from Top Fashion CEO’s

RMG was a proud host of the YJP’s first ever Fashion & Beauty Summit on March 3rd, 2010 at The Chelsea Pearl in Manhattan, NY.  Hundreds of young professionals from the apparel, accessories, beauty and footwear industries attended the event.

The evening featured CEO’s from top fashion lines including:

Abe Chehebar (Chairman, Accessory Network)

Sam Edelmen (CEO of Sam Edelman Shoes)

Efraim Grinberg (Chairman, Movado Group)

Brendan Hoffman (President & CEO, Lord & Taylor)

Andrew Rosen (President & CEO, Theory)

Mark Weber (Charmain & CEO of Donna Karan International & CEO of LVMH)

The CEO’s had some great advice for aspiring fashionistas & entrepreneurs looking to get into the business.  They also commented on the widespread importance of the integration of social media into fashion PR & Marketing and discussed their most challenging “Devil Wears Prada” moments throughout the duration of their fashion careers. We captured the most compelling quotes from the CEO’s during the open panel discussion.

What is the most important attribute you have to possess for getting into the industry?

“You must have passion! Passion & experience are critical. Corporate culture is also important- get involved in a company whose culture you aspire to be part of.”

What are your thoughts on the ever-changing aspect of fashion and how it plays into marketing & the economy?

“The most important thing to ask yourself is- do you have a product that is appealing to a wide audience? Make sure you have a great product and that you understand your customer before marketing to them.” Brendan Hoffman, CEO of Lord & Taylor

What about the hiring process for those interested in starting a career in fashion today?

 

 

 

 

“I recommended working for someone first and gaining experience.  A lot of the overall decision-making process is based on instincts.  My top advice for hiring is to have a gut instinct, react emotionally and always disaster check!” Andrew Rosen, CEO of Theory

“Learn about the corporate culture in the company you are interested in working for- it is the most important thing in a company.  I originally came to Lord & Taylor from Neimans, and shortly after joining the company the market crashed.  I was brought up to use analytics first, but I now rely on my instinct more and have literally repositioned my brain.” Brendan Hoffman, CEO of Lord & Taylor

What is the current status of the luxury business today and what advice can you give to others in the industry?

“The luxury business is alive and well- people who spend money will continue to. You have to develop a great product and create a name that stands for something.  I would also point out that interaction with consumer enhances your ability to navigate your business.” Mark Weber, CEO of Donna Karan & LVMH

“Streamline business and empower people.” Brendan Hoffman, CEO of Lord & Taylor

“I went from selling $2000 handbags at Neimans to $200 handbags Lord & Taylor- at the end of the day both bags are still luxury items. You now have the opportunity to create a luxury environment for your consumer at multiple price points.” Brendan Hoffman, CEO of Lord & Taylor

“I made my career selling to retailers- today the model of the business has changed and the future of business rests with the retailer.”

“Control your product and pricing. Be good at what you do and you’ll be your competitor.”

“Luxury can be at very different price points- what it can’t be is cheap!” Abe Chehebar, Chairman, Accessory Network

“Luxury from Hermes & Gucci is based on quality. When there’s a quality Commodity, luxury will always survive. You must give an image to the buyer and you have to buy quality products.”

“People must appreciate the DNA of the brand- when this occurs the brand will always thrive regardless of economy.”

“The most important value proposition is that the product must have a clear DNA.  For example, how did Tory Burch create a great product? She spoke to her customer in the language they wanted to hear.”

What is your best career advice?

“Find something you LOVE.  When you are young you have the choice to find a career that suits you.  99% out of the days I love what I do!” Andrew Rosen, CEO of Theory

“Everyone has everything you need- we are in the “want” business.” Mark Weber, CEO of Donna Karan & LVMH

“Success is limited to your imagination- products shouldn’t prohibit your creativity.”

“The best way to create value is not about promoting the wrong price- promote the brand name and image as well as attributes that make it desirable.”

How is social media impacting the fashion world?

“Social media is impacting the fashion world by creating brand awareness and increasing web traffic to new products.”

“We are currently building a fan base for several of our brands on Facebook. Social media marketing enables you to really find the people who are passionate about your brand and it gives you a chance to directly communicate with them.  We love finding these people and try our best to now respond to them through social media within 24 hours. We also look at reviews on people’s web sites and blogs. Social media will rise very fast in the fashion world within the next 12-18 months.” Abe Chehebar, Chairman, Accessory Network

“Facebook, Twitter & all of the mediums are new and the industry has not yet recognized the potential. We spend a lot of time trying to figure out how to interact with the consumer via social networks.”

1 CEO’s response when questioned on social media: “We are all over it!”

Click here to see photos from the event!


Columbia Business Alumni Club of NY Social Media Marketing Workshop in Greenwich, CT Led by Kris Ruby, Ruby Media Group

SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING WORKSHOP: PART 2

Are you overwhelmed by social media but know you need to be part of the revolution? Are you still confused what a “tweet” is? Do you keep ignoring invitations to connect on LinkedIN because you are not sure how to use it?
Event Date: Thursday, February 18th, 2010 at 6:00pm

Would you like to use social media?

At our first social media event in Westchester, NY, we gave you an overview of the main social networks. In the follow up to the social media seminar, President and Founder of Ruby Media Group, Kris Ruby, will give you an interactive workshop and take you live into the main social networks including LinkedIN, Twitter and Facebook.
At this workshop, you will learn how to leverage social media sites for personal as well as corporate branding.    Kristen will go through live examples of LinkedIN profiles that are successful for lead generation and branding.  She will pick a live audience member and critique their profile as well as provide helpful branding and PR suggestions to “socialize” their profile for web 2.0
Learn how your company can leverage these new marketing distribution channels to optimize content. At this event, there will also be a Q& A session with Kristen where you can ask her any question on social media marketing.  Join us for Part 2 of our social media workshop and learn how to take advantage of this social phenomenon!
Kristen Ruby, President and Founder,  RubyMediaGroup

Bio: Kristen Ruby is the President and Founder of Ruby Media Group, a social media marketing & Public Relations agency. Kristen “socializes” businesses for web 2.0 and helps companies adapt traditional marketing into social media platforms. Kristen specializes in social media optimization, personal & corporate branding in real time and optimized PR. By utilizing various social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIN, Kristen creates online visibility for her clients and increases overall branding awareness by enhancing their brand image in web 2.0 communities. Kristen is at the epicenter of the social media marketing world and frequently speaks to businesses and associations on new media and viral marketing. She also presents social media marketing workshops for CEO groups to empower business owners to utilize social tools for their networks.  Kristen graduated from Boston University’s College of Communication with a major in Public Relations and a minor in Sociology. Kristen is also the Director of the” Girls In Tech” social media mentorship program to encourage girls to enter the field of social media marketing. She has partnered up with some of Westchester’s most reputable PR and marketing agencies as their New Media Specialist on social media campaigns including Giles Communications and DataKey Consulting.

About Ruby Media Group:

www.rubymediagroup.com

www.twitter.com/sparklingruby

DATE
Thursday, February 18th, 2009

AGENDA
6:00 – 6:30 PM:  Registration. Refreshments and Light Fare included.
6:30 (SHARP) – 7:45 PM – Social Media Workshop Led by Kristen Ruby, Ruby Media Group
7:45-8:15 PM: – Networking

PLACE
Greenwich Library – 2nd Floor Meeting Room
101 West Putnam Avenue, Greenwich, CT  06830
Tel: 203 622.7900

PRICE
CBSAC/NY and CU/Fairfield Members:  $20 thru Feb. 10th, $25 after Feb 10th.

Non-members: $25 for on-line registry or at the door.

On-Line Registration Cut-Off is Feb.14th, but you may register on-site.

We can accommodate a maximum of 45 registrants, so please contact Susan LaFleur directly at 914 774.1199 after Feb 14th if you plan on paying at the door so that she can confirm availability and pencil you in!

REGISTRATION
To purchase tickets click here  Puchase!!

To become a member of CBSACNY click here

Directions:
From the New England Thruway (I-95): Take exit 3 (Arch Street). At end of ramp, turn north, away from Long Island Sound. After traffic light past the RR bridge, take Soundview Drive uphill to Fieldpoint Road. Take right onto Field Point Road. Stay in the left lane, curving left after you pass the Town Hall. The road will intersect with the Post Road (Rte. 1). The Library will be directly across the street, on the right.
From the Merritt Parkway: Take the Lake Avenue exit (Exit 29), and follow signs to central Greenwich. Go 4.5 miles to the Lake Avenue Circle. At the Circle, take Dearfield Drive (directly across the circle as you enter it) The Library entrance is on the left as you approach the traffic light at Rte. 1.

Event Organizers: This event has been organized by the Ct/ Westchester Committee of CBSAC/NY.