Ruby Media Group CEO Kris Ruby Takes on The NYSE

RMG CEO Kris Ruby NYSE CNBC

 

Did you catch Ruby Media Group CEO Kris Ruby on CNBC yesterday? Kris joined CNBC’s Retail Investor Roundtable live from the New York Stock Exchange and shared her stock picks, investing style, and where she sees the market heading.

Check out a clip below:

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Social Media Expert Kris Ruby of Ruby Media Group Weighs in on Baltimore Riots

Have you noticed a change in the way news is reported?  Citizen journalism has become an increasingly relevant form of communication in today’s connected world. The Baltimore Riots are a prime example of how citizens are spreading the news. Thanks to technology, we know the news before it’s reported. The police can receive warnings and share their updates easily and effectively. Thanks to social media, the world can keep up with the Baltimore Riots in realtime. Kris Ruby shares her observations about social media’s role in the Baltimore Riots below.

1. Citizen Journalism: Shows an increase in citizen journalism on social media. A lot of the videos that are going viral on this topic are all from individual citizens cell phones being broadcast on social media. Citizen journalism is again happening in Baltimore. We are relying on citizen videos to get the latest news and updates. Traditional journalism cannot keep up, so we rely on viral videos, tweets, and status updates to get the latest news.

2.  Use of hashtags to follow the riots in real time. You can keep up with riot updates through hashtags. For example, we know the Crips and the Bloods are joining together in riots because of hashtags, tweets, and updates from civilians. Relevant hashtags to follow include #crips #bloods #blackguerillafamily #freddiegray. They are also bringing back the #blacklivesmatter hashtag.

3. Police and National Guard are communicating via Twitter. The police are using Twitter to send out real time updates to citizens.  This provides realtime communication between the police and the community. The National Guard is sending updates and photos to Baltimore citizens and the world via Facebook. With social media, civilians can also communicate with the police and the National Guard, asking questions, commenting on updates, etc.

Baltimore Riots Kris Ruby Weighs In


Kristen Ruby: Power Woman of the Month

Women of Power Next Door

 

Ruby Media Group CEO Kristen Ruby was named Women Of Power Next Door’s April Woman of the Month. In her column, Kris shares her thoughts on failure, success, and how she lives life to the fullest.

Read Kris Ruby’s “Power Woman of the Month” column here.


Kris Ruby Fox and Friends How Does a Cat Video Take the World by Storm?

Social Media Expert Kris Ruby speaks with Fox and Friends about the popularity of optical illusions on social media. The latest “cat on stairs” photo leaves us asking: is the cat going up or down the stairs? Also, is social media making us dumber? Watch Kris discuss what’s so interesting about these images on social media.

Kris Ruby Social Media Expert Fox and Friends Appearance



What a Dating Experiment Taught This Entrepreneur Turned Reality TV Star

Article by Jason Fell

For the full article link click here: http://entm.ag/1CJaFVj

For on-the-go entrepreneurs, finding love isn’t easy. When every waking hour is spent growing a business and chasing your dream, how the heck are you supposed to squeeze in time for anyone else? Even the most successful people in business discover that dating and romance can be a tricky task.

Just ask 28-year-old Kris Ruby, founder of New York City-based public relations firm Ruby Media Group. She and longtime friend Alex Goldman — an entrepreneur himself, having started Five Senses Catering in New York City — starred on Bravo’s Friends to Lovers TV show. The idea, unless the title gave it away, was to find out if friends could indeed develop a successful romantic relationship.

“I encouraged him to start his own business and was intrigued when he followed my direction and started his company,” Ruby tells Entrepreneur. “That piqued my interest.”

Over the course of about a year, Bravo’s TV crew followed Ruby and Goldman around Manhattan and Ruby’s hometown in Westchester County, N.Y., chronicling their path to love. Unfortunately, they weren’t destined to be more than just friends. Goldman eventually got back together with an ex-girlfriend, and Ruby is back to work and also working on herself — personally and as an entrepreneur.

Kris Ruby and Alex Goldman

“[The show] was a tremendous growing opportunity,” Ruby says. “I saw a lot of things I didn’t like about myself after the show and definitely want to focus on fixing those character defects.”

Here are five lessons Ruby learned from the show about being better personally and professionally:

1. Always shower clients with attention.

Whether it’s a love interest or business client, people invest time and money with you and deserve your attention. You can’t fake it or put people off.

“This reality show took a year for me to film while I was simultaneously running an agency and doing TV news segments,” Ruby explains. “I thought I could juggle everything and keep clients happy while filming, but I learned that it was nearly impossible to do it all.”

Just like with personal relationships, if you let things build up in business relationships for too long without any attention, the relationship will sour. “I now realize that it’s the relationship that keeps the client happy in addition to all of the work. If you don’t keep up the personal relationship with your client, the business relationship will eventually fall apart,” Ruby says. “As my business coach Drew McLellan said, ‘Clients are a lot like boyfriends or girlfriends. They need a lot of tending to and love. No one wants to feel like they are not the most important thing in the world to you.'”

2. How you are one way is how you are every way.

If you have trouble making or keeping commitments in your personal or dating life, you will most likely have the same issues in business. “I used to think there was such a separation between my personal life and business life,” Ruby says. “My business life was completely put together — my personal life needed a lot more work, as evidenced on the show.”

While finding true work-life balance can be difficult, Ruby believes entrepreneurs should have stability and happiness in their personal lives, otherwise that imbalance “will pour over and your clients will eventually feel it.”

3. Put the smartphone down.

As a PR and social-media strategist, Ruby is often on her smartphone texting, tweeting and sending emails. But even in this always-on, hyper-connected world, in-person communication trumps digital messages when it comes to keeping clients (and love interests) engaged and happy.

“I was totally wrong on this one and thought texting and emailing would suffice. … I learned my lesson,” Ruby says. “Clients need real in-person love and just texting will get you canned. You actually make it harder on yourself and the relationship by turning it into a long distance relationship when it doesn’t have to be.”

4. Success is an illusion.

Just because you may be successful in one area of your life — such as your business — it doesn’t mean success in your personal life will come easy.

“People automatically assume that if you are a woman in business who has reached a certain level of success, you have everything together,” Ruby says. “As leaders, we need to come out and admit that we don’t always have it together.

“Even if every episode did not show my most glowing moments,” she continues, “I at least showed other women that you can be successful in one area of your life and totally unsuccessful in other areas — in my case, love.”

5. Know the breakup signals.

In many ways, romantic relationships mirror professional ones. When a client wants to talk about the future or go in a different direction, you are about to be fired, Ruby says.

“Break ups with clients can hurt just as much as personal relationship break ups,” she says. “If a client wants to move on, you can’t force them to tell you why. You have to accept that you don’t control the situation and move on.”


Social Media Expert Kris Ruby on CNBC

Ruby Media Group Founder Kris Ruby was thrilled to do a LIVE segment on CNBC from The New York Stock Exchange. During the segment, Ruby discussed her top tech predictions in the market. As a 28 year old growth oriented investor, her focus was on buying for future gains. To watch the full segment, click here

social media expert kris ruby CNBC tv commentatorNYSE social media tech expert kris ruby on air cnbc

 

 

 


Tinder sets age-based pricing tiers

With Tinder becoming one of the most popular forms of online dating, will tiered payment costs defer users from continuing to use the dating app?

Today Tinder launched a premium service called Tinder Plus. Users in the U.S. between 18-20 will have to pay $9.99 per month, and users 30+ will have to pay $19.99 per month. Tinder plus offers users the ability to have unlimited likes, rewind when swiping and even change your location to anywhere in the world with the passport feature.

But is the price for Tinder Plus really worth it?

The passport feature that allows you to change your location while traveling is helpful for those looking to create real world connections wherever they go before they get there. This is great for avid travelers or those looking to make new friends, but isn’t a feature worth paying for. The rewind feature that allows you to go back on a match is helpful but also not worth paying for. When have you ever thought, that was the love of my life I swiped past, I wish I paid money to be able to swipe them again?

But the biggest issue with Tinder’s new rollout isn’t the features- it is the age-based pricing tier model they adopted. This is Tinder’s first attempt at monetization, and the PR component of this launch was handled very poorly.

In an email to Bloomberg Business, Tinder spokeswoman Rosette Pambakian justified the price points by saying “lots of products offer differentiated price tiers by age, like Spotify does for students, for example. Tinder is no different; during our testing we’ve learned, not surprisingly, that younger users are just as excited about Tinder Plus, but are more budget constrained, and need a lower price to pull the trigger.”

Tinder is trying to get an older subset of the population to subsidize the cost of operations of their core users. As Jessica Goldstein pointed out, Tinder is still not solving the basic problem of getting core users to pay for themselves. But that is only one of many problems for Tinder. Their CEO has already made headlines (and not in a good way). As a woman, this is one more check against wanting to use Tinder knowing you have to pay more after you reach the ripe old age of 30.

When I went to Santa Monica recently, I stopped on the pier and wanted to take a touristy photo. The salesman asked me, “Where are you from?” When I said New York, he said it would be $10 for the photo. The Malibu native I was with said, “Wait a second, I was just here last week and the photo was only $5.”

Sizing up your customer base and charging them based on what you think they are willing to pay vs. a standardized rate is wrong.  If Tinder wants to charge users for a premium experience, I have no issue with it. But at least charge everyone the same price. The price for finding love in this country should not have to literally double the second you turn 30.

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